Muhanad Seloom

About Muhanad Seloom

Dr. Muhanad Seloom is an associate lecturer in International Relations at the University of Exeter, United Kingdom. His main research interests are mainly within the fields of political violence and peace-building. He has been particularly focused on counterterrorism policies, ethno-nationalsit, Islamist and sectarian violence in the Middle East.
12 Oct, 2017

The Day After The Independence Referendum in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq

Muhanad Seloom | 12 October 2017 | TR

The Iraqi Kurdistan region independence referendum represents a turning point in Iraq’s modern history. For the first time since its foundation in 1921, Iraq’s territorial integrity is at stake.
The Day After The Independence Referendum in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq2020-08-10T19:42:11+03:00
15 Feb, 2017

Intra-group Fractures in Iraq Paper Series (II) – The Iraqi Arab Shia Political Crisis

Muhanad Seloom | 15 February 2017 | TR

There is a narrative often told by Iraqi politicians and commentators that Arab Sunnis have excluded themselves from politics by boycotting the post-2003
Intra-group Fractures in Iraq Paper Series (II) – The Iraqi Arab Shia Political Crisis2020-08-15T13:08:11+03:00
9 Jan, 2017

Intra-group Fractures in Iraq Paper Series (I): The Sunni Arabs’ Political Crisis

Muhanad Seloom | 09 January 2017 | TR

Since the invasion of Iraq in 2003, U.S. State Department officials have often observed that Arab Sunnis do not have arepresentative leadership in the way the Shia in Iraq do. Almost all Arab Shia in Iraq answer to Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the highest Shia religious authority in Iraq
Intra-group Fractures in Iraq Paper Series (I): The Sunni Arabs’ Political Crisis2020-08-15T13:13:25+03:00
12 Nov, 2016

Iraq After ISIL: Stabilization, Traumatized Minorities, and Disputed Territories

Muhanad Seloom | 12 November 2016 | TR

This paper examines the political and ethno-sectarian implications of driving ISIL out of Mosul, the last city occupied by ISIL in Iraq. Iraq after ISIL cannot be the
Iraq After ISIL: Stabilization, Traumatized Minorities, and Disputed Territories2020-08-10T19:41:09+03:00
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